About a conger eel, there are two way to make sushi, “skin-up ” and “skin-down”. Do you know the difference?

The naval (actually the anus) in the middle of the body serves as the border separating the head part (top) and tail part (bottom) of the eel. The fat is distributed better on the top. People used to say that since the bottom moves more it is more tasty, but is this really true?

It’s also often said, “the top should be served skin-up and the bottom should be served skin-down.”

Skin-up means that the skin side is on top and the meaty side is on the rice.

Skin-down means that the meaty side is facing up and the skin side is on the rice.

Conger eel easily melts apart when it is boiled and broth enters the part where it separates, so the appearance is not as appealing. But unless the crack is extremely obvious, both the top and bottom of the conger eel is often prepared skin-down in sushi.


We hope this information will be helpful.

Revision date: August 27, 2018

Why is sushi so good for your health?

The seafood used in creating sushi are very nutritious products. There has been particular research into the health benefits of Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), which are present in the fat of fish. The vinegar used is also good for your health. It lowers blood pressure and helps relieve fatigue. And depending on the size of the sushi, a meal is only about 450 to 600 calories if you eat 10 pieces. It is a much healthier option when you compare it with the 600 calories in a 200g sirloin steak. Let’s take a closer look at the nutrients found in sushi and how you benefit from them.

The essential fatty acid DHA is found in all fish and shellfish and has the effect of keeping the brain active and preventing aging. Fatty tuna contains a lot of calories, but it also has the most DHA of any sushi.

EPA, another essential fatty acid, may lower cholesterol in the blood and reduce the neutral fat, helping with circulation. This is found in large quantities in silver-skinned fish, shad, horse mackerel, mackerel and sardines.

Taurine is an amino acid, and a component that is present in almost all tissues of the body, but it is found particularly in crustaceans such as shellfish, shrimp and octopus. It has the effect of stabilizing blood pressure, preventing high blood pressure and arteriosclerosis, and lowering cholesterol levels in the blood.

Vitamin A is abundant in sushi such as eel and urchin. It is said to improve eye function, preventing eye fatigue and stopping deteriorating vision. It may also improve the skin and mucous membranes, having an anti-aging effect.

Some people say, to help prevent cancer, it is important to consume adequate amounts of vitamins A, C, E and dietary fiber. Vitamin A acts to suppress the growth of cancer. Vitamin C acts to suppress the production of carcinogenic substances. Vitamin E has the function of preventing senescence of somatic cells. It is thought that dietary fiber has the effect of cleaning the intestines and preventing colon cancer.

As an example, sea urchin is rich in vitamin A, but at the same time it contains a lot of vitamin E useful for preventing aging. The green tea consumed when eating sushi contains Vitamin C, and the dried gourd (kampyo) at the end of the course contains plenty of dietary fiber.

As you can see, sushi is not only delicious, it is also scientifically proven that it is good for health. Just be careful to not overeat sushi with too much fat content like fatty tuna, or pieces with a lot of sugar such as conger eel.


We hope this information will be helpful.

Revision date: August 21, 2017

 

 

 

Which wines pair well with sushi?

Fermented beverages such as sake and wine pair well with sushi. Sake is made from rice. So it only makes sense that this would pair well with sushi – also made with rice. It is also the only alcohol that eliminates the smell of fish and shellfish.

On the other hand, when considering compatibility with wine, toppings that use strong seasonings like Nikiri, including tuna and conger eel with sweet filling, match superbly with matured red wines such as Pinot Noir.

For example, Bourgogne Chambolle Musigny, Cote de Beaune, Morey-Saint-Denis, etc.

White wines such as a lighter Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc and Riesling go well with white fish flavored with Citrus sudachi and yuzu or squid eaten with salt.

For example, Bourgogne Chablis.

However, neither red nor white wine goes well with herring or salmon roe. The iron specific to wine is said to contribute to the fishy smell of fish roe.

In the research of one wine manufacturer, the factor that generates the smell of fish and shellfish is the iron (ferrous ion) found in wine. Wines with relatively low levels of iron such as Sherry (Spain), Champagne (France) fermented twice in the bottle, Cava (Spain) and Franciacorta (Italy) mature without adding sulfite, which prevents oxidization. This reduces the ferrous ion in the wine and the fishy smell is virtually unnoticeable.

Either way, the research of wine and sushi pairings is still insufficient and there haven’t yet been any reports of unexpected compatibility. If anyone out there has found a wine that does pair well with herring or salmon roe, please be sure to share that information with us.


We hope this information will be helpful.

Revision date: July 10, 2017

 

 

Judge a chef’s ability and quality of the shop by its Anago (Conger eel)

Sushi restaurants that advertise “Edo style” on the sign somewhat fear customers who order Anago right off the bat. If the customer then eats as if they are really taking the time to taste the sushi, then any chef not fully confident in their skills will want to hide under the sushi counter.

Anago is a topping that really demonstrate a chef’s skills (or lack thereof).

Edo-style sushi chefs work on many toppings. Anago is a perfect example of these toppings. It is actually first steamed to remove the fat. However, it’s a difficult balance to remove the fat while still leaving the umami. The steamed Anago is then boiled and flavored. Since the fish is plain, the flavoring is also a subtle skill and not an easy task.

Depending on the shop, the chef may make the sushi with the boiled fish, use Nitsume (boiling down) to bring out the flavor or lightly roast the fish before combining it with the rice. The chef’s ideas and abilities are apparent in the final dish. If the sushi is made from the freshly boiled fish, it should be soft and melt in your mouth…if the chef knows what they are doing! Lightly roasted Anago will have an aroma that fills your entire mouth.

The work this topping takes to serve is a chance for sushi shops to show off their specialties, but it is also a clear indicator of the quality of the shop. The level of the chef and quality of the sushi shop will be revealed as soon as you place Anago in your mouth.


We hope this information will be helpful.

Revision date: May 27, 2017