What is the difference between Bafun uni and Ezobafun uni?

While they are very similar to Green sea urchins (Bafun uni), Short-spined sea urchins (Ezobafun uni) are a size larger and have thick spines.

Green sea urchins are 5cm in diameter and Short-spined sea urchins are 10cm in diameter. Green sea urchins are distributed from the southern areas of Hokkaido down to Kyushu. Short-spined sea urchins are mainly distributed in the Hokkaido and Tohoku areas. The most commonly eaten green sea urchins that are Short-spined sea urchins in Japan.


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Revision date: October 15, 2018

Automatic reply mails from Sushi University

The reply from the reservation system is  based on the application by the guests autocratically. The original information of your reservation cannot be updated by our system. If there is a change, the new information will not be reflected in the following 4 automatic reply mails.

[Automatic reply mails from Sushi University]

1.The thank you mail to inform you the acceptance for your application

2.The mail to confirm your reservation

3.The mail to reconfirm your reservation : will be delivered the day before Sushi University

4.(only if) The mail to inform you the acceptance for your cancel


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Revision date: October 15, 2018

Is the handmade ginger in quality sushi restaurants free?

The ginger served in sushi restaurants is called “gari”. There are people who just chomp down the gari since it’s all free.

However, in certain prestigious restaurants where the gari is handmade, it does end up on the bill. This is because considering the time and ingredients that go into making the gari, the restaurant will be losing money if they don’t charge for it.

 

However, most sushi restaurants purchase their gari from companies that specialize in it. These mostly include pickling manufactures that have expanded to China or Southeast Asia and have factories there.

When made at these factories, large amounts of ginger is soaked in the stock solution, creating gari in bulk. The quality has improved greatly over the years, but often the fibers are crushed making it soggy, or the gari is stained from ume vinegar.

On the other hand, homemade gari and gari made in Japan is flavored with vinegar and salt while sugar is used sparingly as a subtle flavoring. Handmade gari is crunchy and chewy. The color is also the original pale yellow of ginger.

And during the fresh ginger season at the beginning of summer the price of fresh, domestic ginger jumps up to thousands of yen per kilogram. Since ginger has a high water content, it can be wrung out to reduce 1kg of ginger down to 300g. Making delicious gari by hand costs money. It is also a daunting task of making a year’s worth in advance. Once it’s done there has to be a refrigerator dedicated to storing only the gari.

When you put it that way, homemade gari is far more expensive than its imported equivalent. Providing homemade gari is one of the things that sets sushi restaurants apart from each other. Of course even if you’re not charged for the gari, eating too much will affect your sense of taste for the meal.


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Revision date: October 8, 2018

Why is there Edo-style sushi outside of Tokyo? The answer is found in a historical event!

The Edo-style nigiri-zushi that was born toward the end of the Edo period (the beginning of the 1800’s) instantly spread throughout Edo. Circa 1850 in the towns of Edo, there were 1-2 sushi shops per town. At the time there was one soba shop for every two towns, which means the ratio of sushi shops was much higher.

This Edo-style sushi eventually spread throughout the entire country. One of the catalysts for this was the Great Kanto earthquake of 1923. The sushi shops throughout Tokyo were destroyed in the earthquake and many of the chefs were out of work. Unlike now, it took a long time to reconstruct after disasters in those days.

The sushi chefs needed to work in order to survive and they dispersed throughout Japan, opening “Edo-style Sushi” restaurants. In other words, the reason you see Edo-style Sushi signs in the Tohoku and Chubu regions is because of the Great Kanto earthquake.

After another 20 years or so passed, Tokyo burned down in air raids. After the war they were unable to secure the fish and vegetables, let alone the rice, needed to make sushi, so it was difficult for restaurants to survive off of sales alone.

That was when an innovative system for sushi shops was allowed for by GHQ (General Headquarters). The system was called a contracted selling system in which the customer would bring in one cup of rice (180cc) in exchange for 10 pieces of nigiri-zushi, including any sushi rolls.

This system was limited to Edo-style sushi. It didn’t apply to “Hakozushi” (meaning ‘box sushi’, also called ‘Osaka Sushi’), which was popular in Kansai, so any sushi shops that wanted to stay in business had to serve Edo-style sushi, which means that Edo Sushi shops appeared all over the country.

It soon became more well-known than Hakozushi* and the term “sushi” became synonymous with the Edo-style nigiri-zushi.

*Hakozushi : Sushi is made by stacking toppings such as shrimp, sea bream and conger eel on top of vinegar-rice and pressed into a wooden box to create a square-shaped sushi. The vinegar rice is cooked with a sweetened kelp and all of the toppings are flavored with mirin (sweet rice wine) and sugar.


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Revision date: October 1, 2018

What is the difference between “鮨,” “鮓” and “寿司” (all ready “Sushi”). Most Japanese people don’t know the answer to this question.

As far as I know, there are three ways “sushi” is written on sushi restaurant curtains in Japanese kanji characters: 鮨, 鮓 and 寿司. Do you know the difference?

Broadly, in the Kanto area 鮨 is generally used while 鮓 is more common in Kansai. 寿司 is used commonly everywhere in Japan.

However, of the three, only 鮨 and 鮓 are seen in ancient Chinese literature. 鮨 was seen as a dictionary entry as early as the 5th to 3rd centuries B.C., and it’s origin is described as combining “fish” and “shiokara” (briny flavor) resulting in the term 鮨.

On the other hand, in A.D. 1st to 2nd century dictionaries, “鮓” appeared, and is explained to depict “a storage container for fish.” Toward the end of the second century 鮓 was used for the term “narezushi”.

But around the third century, the briny meaning of 鮨 and the term “narezushi*” written as 鮓 started to be used interchangeably. That is how the words were imported to Japan.

In Japan, the character “鮓” was often used in literature from the end of the Heian era to the end of the Edo era. Eventually the use of “鮨” was revived during the Meiji era (for unknown reasons). It was a natural transition that Kanto came to use “鮨” and Kansai came to use “鮓”.

Incidentally, the kanji “寿司” was created from the phonetics. Its use for celebratory occasions became commonplace throughout Japan.

*”Narezushi” is the primitive version of Japanese sushi. It means covering seafood with salt and then soaking in rice for a few years as a form of lactic acid fermentation, which brings out the acidity.


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Revision date: September 24, 2018

Do you know the difference between “Nami (並)” “Jo (上)” and “Tokujo (特上)”? Of course you know that Tokujo is the best deal when you order, right?

When you go into a sushi restaurant and look at the menu, you’ll see the terms “Nami (並)” “Jo (上)” and “Tokujo (特上). Japanese people know from the kanji that “Tokujo” is the best, but generally they don’t know what the specific differences are.

Today I’ll explain what each set consists of. If you order “Nami” for one person, this is the typical course:

Tuna Akami: 1 pc. Salmon: 1 pc. Shiromi (white fish): 1 pc. Silver-finned fish such as mackerel: 1 pc. Raw squid: 1 pc. Octopus: 1 pc. Egg: 1 pc.
That’s 7 nigiri pieces and there might be 4 cuts or so of dried gourd or cucumber rolls. To be more specific, the white fish may be different each day, depending on what the restaurant has. The silver-finned fish is also often changed to something like Kohada. The octopus will have been frozen. If the course includes shrimp, it will always be a giant tiger prawn.

If you’re a bit more adventurous and go for the “Jo” course, you’ll be served 9 pieces of nigiri sushi. Fatty tuna (chu-toro) is added to the lineup, which means that with the Akami that’s two of the most popular toppings. But you won’t get the salmon. Depending on the season you may be served bonito. The shrimp may be changed to sweet shrimp. Salmon roe will also be added, making the set more colorful. The thin rolls are changed to salmon roles.

When you upgrade to the “Tokujo” set it will include conger, which takes time to prepare, and the white fish will be top class flounder or sea bream. You will also be served more delicious parts of the tuna. The higher cost means you will get higher quality sushi, which is represented by the prawns and sea urchin. The egg nigiri is upgraded to a thick egg omelet and it will also include something like a blood clam. All this will go into 10 beautiful nigiri pieces and rolls worthy of an Instagram pic.

The price of “Jo” is twice that of “Nami”. So “Tokujo” at triple the price is really an excellent deal. Considering the value of the toppings, the price is unbeatable. The “Nami” set is made up of toppings in the “Nigemono” category (Nigemono includes squid, kohada, octopus and egg toppings). To put it bluntly, this set only includes toppings that are cheap and have a variety of uses.

Psychologically people tend to choose the average, so when presented with “Nami” “Jo” and “Tokujo,” an overwhelmingly large percentage of people choose “Jo.” “Tokujo” is a bit expensive, but you came to eat sushi so “Nami” isn’t going to cut it. You select “Jo,” right in the middle so you won’t be judged. The people running these restaurants know this well and they set items they want to sell the most at the “Jo” price. The items they want to sell the most are those with the best profit margins, so usually these are in the “Jo” set. This is exactly what the restaurant wants.

However, they can’t do that for the “Tokujo” set. “Tokujo” is the pride of the restaurant and they want to preserve the quality. Even if they change the type of topping, it will be a topping worthy of “Tokujo”. They don’t want to serve their most expensive dishes and have a disappointed customer.

So if you’re going to pay for sushi anyway, it’s better to pay just a little bit more for the “Tokujo” course.


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Revision date: September 17, 2018

Assessing Fish at the fish market!

One important task of sushi chefs is going to Tsukiji every morning, looking at fish with their own eyes and assessing the quality. Having a good eye is important in order to get the highest quality possible, but this is cultivated by experience. They are also constantly obtaining information from the fishmongers at the market regarding what the best fish of the season and their localities. It’s almost a game as to whether they can get high-quality fish at the optimum price everyday. The skills of a sushi chef start with this assessment.


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Revision date: September 11, 2018

Why do sushi chefs make the sushi in front of the customers?

Many regular patrons of sushi restaurants look forward to having casual conversations with the sushi chefs. It might be difficult to understand for visitors who don’t speak Japanese, but sushi restaurants are the only restaurants in the world that customers can speak directly with the head chef. If you don’t need conversation, then the waiter could just bring the sushi made back in the kitchen. Of course they also want customers to see the beautiful act of making sushi, but there is no particular reason that the sushi has to be made in front of the customer. The technical term for this is “Exposed Business,” meaning that the chefs are putting themselves on display for the customers. Did you learn something new?


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Revision date: September 2, 2018

About a conger eel, there are two way to make sushi, “skin-up ” and “skin-down”. Do you know the difference?

The naval (actually the anus) in the middle of the body serves as the border separating the head part (top) and tail part (bottom) of the eel. The fat is distributed better on the top. People used to say that since the bottom moves more it is more tasty, but is this really true?

It’s also often said, “the top should be served skin-up and the bottom should be served skin-down.”

Skin-up means that the skin side is on top and the meaty side is on the rice.

Skin-down means that the meaty side is facing up and the skin side is on the rice.

Conger eel easily melts apart when it is boiled and broth enters the part where it separates, so the appearance is not as appealing. But unless the crack is extremely obvious, both the top and bottom of the conger eel is often prepared skin-down in sushi.


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Revision date: August 27, 2018

The migrating route of Inshore bluefin tuna and fishing place!

Tuna caught in the coastal regions of the Japan Sea is notable as the best bluefin tuna in January. Iki, a small island in Kyushu area is one of the famous ports for tuna.

In February and March, the tuna auction market becomes slack due to rough weather. Just a few tunas from Nachikatsuura where is also the famous port for tuna are on the market.

In March and April, tunas become thin because their eggs need many nutrients.

In May, large tuna is seldom seen in the Tsukiji Fish Market. Even if there is, its body is really thin. “Kinkaimono” which means a shore-fish is generally considered as high-class tuna, but in this season, imported tuna is useful instead.

It is said that Pacific Bluefin tunas spawn around Japanese waters between Taiwan and Okinawa in April and May. And then, they go up to fertile, north sea along the eastern coast of Japan.

In June, “Chubo” which is young and small tuna is taken hugely off the coast of the Sea of Japan. The school of Chubo begin moving northward in this season.

In July and August, tunas can be seen occasionally but their bodies are still thin. Instead, Boston Tuna which is caught in the Atlantic Ocean and nicknamed “Jumbo” is on the market. Its fresh is softer than “Kinkaimono” and it doesn’t have medium-fatty part which “Kinkaimono” has.

In September, Boston Tunas are at their best with plenty of fat on them. The best season of Boston Tuna is limited and ends in October. But fortunately, Japanese tunas come into season.

The school of tunas split up into two groups, the one takes Pacific Ocean route and another takes the Japan Sea route and both of them move northward along the Japanese Islands. Some of them reach the Tsugaru Strait where and the season of Tuna begins from September to next January. Oma town and Toi town is famous nationwide for its catch of tuna from the Tsugaru Strait. The flavor of tuna in September is still weak but it becomes stronger in October. In November, feed of tunas such as Pacific saury or Japanese common squid with plenty of fat increase and flavor of tuna also gets stronger. In December, the peak season comes around.

A catch of tuna falls off in January and it enters the final season. The temperature of sea water gets cold and feed of tuna, squids decrease and the fishing season in this area ends.


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Revision date: August 20, 2018

Tuna is allowed to rest before it is used.

Once a bluefin tuna is caught, it arrives in Tsukiji fish market within a day or two. However, that fish is not used as a sushi topping that day. No mater how good the tuna is, it starts out very stiff and is not in a state where it should be eaten. The meat is hard and the white muscle lines are left in your mouth. The odor and acidic taste of the red meat is strong and the unique sweetness of the fish is nowhere to be found. After it has rested the muscles soften, bringing out the fat.

Then, when the sushi chef gets the tuna, he first separates the red, lean meat and the fatty toro portion, rewraps them separately and, seals them in plastic and puts them on ice. Next is waiting for the “young” meat, not yet suitable for eating, to mature. The number of days the fish will be rested depends on the size of the fish and the temperature. The smaller the cut and the warmer the temperature, the shorter the rest time. Generally the time is from 3-14 days.

This “young” fish not ready for consumption is a fresh, deep color but as it matures the color darkens, the fat is brought out and becomes a fleshy color. Proper care must be taken because if it’s rested for too long, the color changes too quickly.


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Revision date: August 13, 2018

Why do most sushi restaurants have 8 seats at the counter?

At sushi restaurants, only the master chef makes the sushi. Depending on the shop, the apprentices don’t even touch the knives. The texture of a fish changes greatly with the way a fish is cut, drastically affecting the workmanship of the sushi. There is a clear difference in taste when the master makes a piece of sushi from when the apprentice does. It is also commonly thought that a sushi chef can only take care of about 8 customers at once while he is also preparing pieces of sushi, so most counters have around 8 seats.


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Revision date: August 6, 2018

Why can’t Pacific saury be caught?

On the Pacific Ocean side of Japan there is a three-way deadlock between sardines, mackerel and Pacific saury. There is a theory that the species take turns with increasing and decreasing populations. In recent years there has been an increase in sardines and, in turn, there has been a decline in Pacific saury.


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Revision date: July 30, 2018

What is the difference between maturing and rotting?

When fish die, stopping the supply of ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate), the source of muscle energy, the muscle fibers gradually harden. As time passes, it gently dissolves and the ATP breaks down, changing into umami components due to self-digestion. The umami created by self-digestion of ATP is “maturing” and the process after that is “rotting.”


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Revision date: July 23, 2018

We’ll introduce all sushi toppings throughout Japan, from Okinawa to Hokkaido!

<Akami-Red flesh fish>

Binnaga maguro-Longfin white tuna

Katsuo-Bonito (Oceanic bonito, Striped tuna)

Kihada maguro-Yellowfin tuna

Maguro (Kuromaguro, Honmaguro, Shibi)-Bluefin tuna

Makajiki-Striped marlin

Mebachi maguro-Bigeye tuna

Mekajiki-Swordfish

Minami maguro (Indo maguro)-Southernbluefin tuna

Suma-Wavyback skipjack, Eastern little tuna

<Shiromi-White flesh fish>

Ainame-Green ling

Amadai-Horsehead tilefish

Ara-Rock-cod

Buri-Japanese amberjack

Ebotai (Ibodai)-Butterfish

Engawa-Thin muscle of the dorsal fin of Japanese flounder, Marbled sole, etc.

Fugu (Torafugu)-Globefish (Blowfish, Puffer )

Hiramasa-Amberjack

Hirame-Japanese flounder (Olive flounder)

Hoshigarei-Spotted halibut

Houbou-Bluefin searobin

Inada-Japanese amberjack (30〜40cm)

Isaki-Striped pigfish

Ishidai-Barred knifejaw

Ishigarei-Stone flounder

Kamasu (Akakamasu)-Barracuda

Kanpachi-Greater amberjack

Kasugo (Chidai, Kidai)-Baby Red sea-bream (Crimson sea-bream, Eellowback sea-bream)

Kawahagi-Filefish

Kijihata(Akou)-Redspotted Grouper

Kinki (Kichiji)-Thornhead

Kinmedai-Splendid alfonsino

Kochi (Magochi)-Bartail flathead

Kue-Longtooth grouper

Kurodai(Chinu)-Blackhead seabream

Kurosoi-Black rockfish

Mahata (Hata)-Grouper (Rock-cod, Seven band grouper)

Makogarei-Marbled sole

Matsukawagarei-Barfin flounder

Mebaru-Rockfish

Medai-Japanese butterfish

Meichidai-Nakedhead

Mejina-Greeenfish (Nibbler, Rudderfish)

Mutsu-Japanese bluefish

Nametagarei (Babagarei)-Slime flounder

Nodoguro (Akamutsu)-Blackthroat seaperch

Okoze (Oniokoze)-Devil stinger

Sakuramasu-Cherry salmon

Satsukimasu-Sasu salmon

Sawara-Japanese spanish mackerel

Shimaaji-Crevalle jack (Trevally)

Suzuki-Japanese seaperch

Tachiuo-Largehead hairtail (Cutlassfish, Scabbardfish)

Tai (Madai)-Red sea-bream

Tara (Madara)-Pacific cod

Umazurahagi-Leatherfish

<Hikarimono - Silver-skinned fish>

Aji (Maaji) - Japanese horse-mackerel

Ayu - Ayu

Gomasaba- Spotted mackerel

Hamo -Daggertooth pike conger

Hatahata - Japanese sandfish

Iwashi - Sardine

Kisu - Japanese whiting

Kohada - Gizzard shad

Mamakari - Big-eye sardine

Saba - Pacific mackerel

Sanma - Pacific saury

Sayori - Halfbeak

Shinko - Baby Gizzard shad

Tobiuo - Japanese flyingfish

<Ika/Tako-Squid/ Octopus>

Aori ika-Bigfin reef squid

Hotaru ika-Firefly squid

Iidako-Ocellated octopus

Kensaki ika (Shiroika)-Swordtip squid

Mizudako-North-pacific giant octpus

Shin ika-Baby cuttlefish

Sumi ika (Kouika)-Cuttlefish

Surume ika-Japanese common squid

Tako (Madako)-Octopus

Yari ika-Spear squid

<Kai-Shell>

Akagai-Ark shell

Aoyagi (Bakagai)-Rediated trough-shell (Surf-clam)

Awabi (Kuroawabi)-Japanese abalone

Baigai-Japanese ivory-shell

Ezoawabi-Ezo-abalone

Hokkigai-Hen-clam

Hotate-Common scallop (Giant ezo-scallop, Frill, Fan-shell)

Ishigakigai-Bering Sea cockle

Iwagaki-Rock-oyster

Kaki (Magaki)-Oyster

Kobashira-The adductor of bakagai shellfish (Rediated trough-shell)

Madakaawabi-Giant abalone

Megaiawabi-Disk abalone

Mirugai (Honmirugai)-Otter-shell (Keen’s gaper)

Namigai (shiromiru)-Japanese geoduck

Nihama-Common orient clam (Japanese hard clam, White clam)

Sazae-Spiny top-shell

Shirogai (Manjugai, Saragai)-Northern great tellin

Tairagi (Tairagai)-Pen-shell (Fan-shell)

Tokobushi-Tokobushi abalone

Torigai-Egg-cockle (Heart-shell)

Tubugai (Matsubu)-Ezo-neptune (Whelk, Winckle)

<Ebi/Kani-Prawn/Crab>

Aka ebi-Argentine Red Shrimp

Ama ebi-Deepwater prawn (Deepwater shrimp, Pink prawn)

Black tiger (Ushi ebi)-Black tiger

Botan ebi-Botan shrimp (Pink prawn, Pink shrimp)

Gasa ebi-Argis lar

Ise ebi-Japanese spiny lobster

Kegani-Horsehair crab (Korean crab, Kegani crab)

Kuruma ebi-Kuruma prawn

Sakura ebi-Sakura shrimp

Shako-Squilla (Mantis shrimp, Edible mantis shrimp)

Shima ebi-Morotoge shrimp

Shiro ebi (Shira ebi)-Japanese glass shrimp

Tarabagani-King crab (Alaska king crab, Red king crab)

Zuwaigani-Snow crab (Queen crab, Zuwai-crab)

<Others>

Akauni-Red sea urchin

Anago-Japanese conger

Bafununi-Short-spined sea uruchin (Green sea urchin)

Ezobafununi-Short-spined sea urchin

Hoya-Sea squirt

Ikura-Salmon roe

Kazunoko-Herring roe

Kitamurasakiuni-Northern sea urchin

Komochikonbu-Herring spawn on kelp

Murasakiuni-Purple sea urchin

Namako-Sea cucumber

Noresore-Young Japanese conger

Shirako-Globefish testis

Shirohige-White spin sea urchin

Sirauo-Icefish

Tamago-Egg omelet

Unagi-Japanese eel

<Norimaki-Seaweed roll>

Anakyu maki-Gizzard shad and Cucumber roll

Himokyu maki-Mantle of ark shell and Cucumber roll

Kanpyou maki-Sweet-simmered kanpyo (dried gourd strip) roll

Kappa maki-Cucumber roll

Kohada maki-Gizzard shad roll

Namida maki-Vinegared rice and thin strips of Wasabi rolled in seaweed

Negitoro maki-Green onion and toro roll

Shinko maki-Pickled radish and shiso plant roll

Takuwan maki-Pickled radish roll

Tekka maki-Norimaki sushi roll with red tuna and grated wasabi at the core.

Torotaku maki-Toro and Pickled radish roll

Umeshiso maki-Pickled ume and shiso plant roll


We hope this information will be helpful.

Revision date: July 16, 2018